Tag Archive | death

are you a victim?

Well, sure you are.

Besides my faith, the one thing that has helped me not stay in a continual state of being a victim is knowing I am not alone.

Countless numbers of mothers have lost their children over the centuries. I think about the mothers who lost 2 and sometimes 3 sons during the Civil War. I think about the fatal diseases that took young lives. The accidents. The premature births.

There has been suffering since the beginning of time.

I wasn’t prepared. Mostly because life today is so different in many ways.

Or else we are busier than ever and don’t have much time to think about the what ifs.

Either way, things happen to other people, right?

And some parts of my faith made me feel insulated. After all, I prayed.

But then it happened on that warm, September afternoon. Death came to the door, knocked it down, and with it came the end of innocence.

We wonder where God is?

Well, where was he when sons bled to death on the fields of Gettysburg?

Where was he when cancer took one child and spared another?

Where was he when a mother labored for hours, only to hold a lifeless baby?

Where was he when my son decided to take his life?

All I know is God sees and he knows.  He promises to comfort. He promises one day we will understand.

We have to see beyond here and now or we will be hopeless. Hope sees beyond here and now. And the God of all creation promises he will fix it and make it right. All tears will be wiped away. All sorrow will be turned to joy.

We have to wait. And waiting is very hard sometimes.

If I hate God for what he has allowed to happen, the rest of my life will be bitter misery. It does no good.

So I join with the multitudes since the beginning of time and say, though he slay me, yet will I trust in Him.

And I will wait.

No longer a victim. But full of hope and expectation.

Vince Alongi / Foter / CC BY

Vince Alongi / Foter / CC BY

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death.

a531bcaec2c71734101cdb348047f5ea Death is like a storm.

The winds howl, the rain plummets, the sky is black.

Beyond the threatening sky, there is blue sky and sunshine. You just can’t see it. But it’s there.

Death is not the end. But for now, it feels like it.

This Bible verse gives the Christian hope-

He [God] will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away. Revelation 21:4

Photo credit: jenny downing / Foter / CC BY

Photo credit: jenny downing / Foter / CC BY

The Bible says God set eternity in our hearts. That’s why we wonder about life after we die.

The one who put eternity there is the one who has the answers to our wondering.

Only believe.

beautiful strength.

Jan11

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You can’t fix grief.

A paper cut will heal quickly.

A gun shot wound requires more time.

Sometimes the bullet cannot be removed.

People live with bullets inside of them.

People live with broken hearts.

This isn’t hopelessness.

It is acceptance of what is.

Once accepted,  you carry grief with  strength…

beautiful strength.

~~~

Photo Courtesy:http://www.flickr.com/photos/mait/5184718154/

how?

Jun19

 

With all our technological, medical, and scientific advancements, the common and routine can frustrate us.

That’s because we are limited. And the first step of grieving is acknowledging and admitting death is inevitable. The truth sets us free. That means the part of us which is weighed down with confusion, discouragement, frustration and disappointment breaks free with acceptance.

We are made of the same stuff as our predecessors who lost loved ones to disease, accidents, and war.

We cannot stop it.

Generations before us lived with death. Does this make our personal grieving easier? No. But it helps us to know we are made of the same stuff as our ancestors. We’re human.

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We cannot control everything that happens to us the way we choose our ring tones or favorite search engine.

To grieve is to accept.

But to accept is to trust.

Trust in what? Or whom?

There is always someone who writes the book.

In the Beginning, God created the Heaven and the Earth.

Genesis 1:1

~~~

Photo Credit: Etolane / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND,

scripture friday.

Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me. 

Psalm 23:4

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~~~

Photo Credit: Waiting For The Word / Foter.com / CC BY

death.

Death will come to all of us.

The Bible calls it an enemy – an enemy that one day will be destroyed permanently.

He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death’ or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.

autumn-dawn-1_l

Years ago, I think people dealt with death better than we do today.

The Encyclopedia of Children’s Health states: In 1900, children experienced firsthand, seeing a loved one die on the farm or in the home. Then, two world wars came and children experienced death in the remote events of far off places. By the 1950s, though some children did experience the death of a loved one in the Korean War, these were few. Death became an abstraction, something children only read about or experienced in a movie or television. 

Death was expected and accepted. Were they stronger? If so, in what ways?

Don’t misunderstand. They hurt like we hurt when a loved one died. But I wonder if our world today, with all its conveniences and hurry-up-and-get-going tendencies, have created within us an inability to accept the slow and inevitable processes of life. We have been groomed to fix, forge, and no, failure is not an option.

Just food for thought.

~~~

Photo credit:

James Jordan / Foter / CC BY-ND

how?

With all our technological, medical, and scientific advancements, the common and routine can frustrate us.

That’s because we are limited. And the first step of grieving is acknowledging and admitting death is inevitable. The truth sets us free. That means the part of us which is weighed down with confusion, discouragement, frustration and disappointment breaks free with acceptance.

We are made of the same stuff as our predecessors who lost loved ones to disease, accidents, and war.

We cannot stop it.

Generations before us lived with death. Does this make our personal grieving easier? No. But it helps us to know we are made of the same stuff as our ancestors. We’re human.

macro-bebe_l

We cannot control everything that happens to us the way we choose our ring tones or favorite search engine.

To grieve is to accept.

But to accept is to trust.

Trust in what? Or whom?

There is always someone who writes the book.

In the Beginning, God created the Heaven and the Earth.

Genesis 1:1

~~~

Photo Credit: Etolane / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND,